main page | historic homes | upcoming events | gift shoppe | organizations
government | local history | links of interest | town directory | contact us


The following excerpt is reprinted from: "The Collierville Star," a newspaper for Collierville, Tennessee and her tributary country; original article is dated November 24, 1900, Volume IX, No. 47 (no byline given).


A TERRIBLE CYCLONE --
Carrying Death and Destruction In Its Wake...
75 People Killed. Two Distinct Storms.

Two of the most disastrous storms ever witnessed in Tennessee and Mississippi, passed near Collierville last Tuesday evening. One at 4 o'clock, and the another following in its track at [not legible].

LA GRANGE ALMOST SWEPT AWAY

A Star reporter visited La Grange, Tenn., a pretty little town 25 miles east of Collierville and found it almost completely destroyed. Out of nine business houses of the place, five were wrecked by the winds, scattering the goods of each [not legible].

Mr. Walter Moody, manager of the Pankey and Gaither Plow Company just across the street from the depot, was blown from a window of the factory and instantly killed. His body was found two hundred yards from the building. The factory was totally destroyed.

An old negro woman by the name of Sarah Green, was killed in the wreckage of her house, which stood in a few yards of the demolished factory. No other deaths were reported at that place.

Most of the dwellings and business houses of this ill-fated town will be rebuilt.

Three churches -- the Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian -- were blown to the ground and pieces of them scattered for miles around.

A Star reporter interviewed Mr. A.D. Lewis of the Presbyterian church, who said "I think our people will rebuild, though our loss is great," and Mr. T.J. Shelton, of the Baptist church informed us that the membership was very small there and he did not think they would be able to rebuild. The loss of the church was at least $2,000. The Rev. B.B. Thomas said to our reporter:

"My parsonage and my family had a close call, but thank God we are all safe. The cyclone missed my parsonage only six feet. I measured the width of the track of the storm today, and it was exactly 175 yards. I stood on my back porch and saw it coming. It sounded like the roaring of a thousand trains..."

 

main page | historic homes | upcoming events | gift shoppe | organizations
government | local history | links of interest | town directory | contact us

© Town of LaGrange, Tennessee 2001; all rights reserved

TOP OF PAGE